Josh Hurst Agent

Josh Hurst (Agent)

KFB Insurance Agent Since 2009


Josh is your local Kentucky Farm Bureau Agent and a lifelong resident of Shelby County. He prides himself on the fact that he is able to provide a service to fellow Shelby Countians that offers great protection with unmatched service. He enjoys helping residents of Shelby County manage risks and assisting customers when there is a loss.
He is a member of the Louisville Agriculture Club, served as President of the Shelby Co. Chamber of Commerce (2010-11), currently serves as Chairman of the Shelbyville Housing Authority, member of Kiwanis - Shelby Co.,and is a graduate of Leadership Shelby ('11) and currently serves on the board of directors for Leadership Shelby. He also is a part of the Franklin County Farmers Market in Frankfort where you can find him on most weekends during growing season. He also enjoys working with his wife throughout the year as part of a family farming operation in Shelby County.
Josh is a graduate of Shelby County High School ('97) and the University of Kentucky ('04) and is an active alumnus of the U.K. and Kappa Sigma Fraternity Alumni Associations. He and his wife (also of Shelby Co) have two children, a daughter and a son.
Please contact Josh for all your insurance needs TODAY!

How can Josh Hurst help you today?

KFB Insurance Learning Library

When and where can I fly my drone?
When and where can I fly my drone?

As more and more people pluck drones off retail store shelves for both personal and business use, these little sci-fi-like flying machines are becoming an increasingly common sight in Kentucky’s skies.

An overview of distracted driving
An overview of distracted driving

Today, the number of cellphones in the U.S. surpasses the country’s population. And according to a study by AT&T, 70 percent of people admit to using those cellphones while driving.

From the 1960s to now: a history of distracted driving
From the 1960s to now: a history of distracted driving

Early examples of distracted driving studies go back as far as 1963, when scientist John Senders took to the roads blindfolded – all in the name of research.