Jessica Koverdan Agent

Jessica Koverdan (Agent)

KFB Insurance Agent Since 2007

Helping people is what makes my job worth getting up in the morning to do. From the time I was a little girl I knew I wanted to be an insurance agent for Kentucky Farm Bureau. Seems like kind of a specific goal for a young girl, I know, but I grew up working with my dad in the Kentucky Farm Bureau office in Paducah and once you get a taste of what it’s like to help others during a time of disaster, it’s hard to think of doing anything else.

When a disaster strikes the last thing you want to do is to call your insurance company, only to be put on hold for what seems like hours. During a crisis you need to know that your agent is available and that you’re not just another claim to them.

My customers know that they have access to me 24/7 on my cell phone. If they need me, they know they can reach me. That’s what makes having a local agent in McCracken County so beneficial. My customers have faces and names. They are never just another claim. Call me at 270.444.8400 or e-mail me at Jessica.Koverdan@kyfb.com for a free, no-obligation quote. 

How can Jessica Koverdan help you today?

KFB Insurance Learning Library

Rainy day driving tips
Rainy day driving tips

For the most part, the days of black ice and snowy roads are behind us – but don’t let your guard down! The rainy season is now upon us.

An even brighter idea – disposing of CFL bulbs the right way
An even brighter idea – disposing of CFL bulbs the right way

A little more than two hundred years ago, a Cornish chemist by the name of Sir Humphry Davy connected wires to a battery and a piece of carbon, causing the carbon to glow. This seemingly insignificant event was the first step toward a life-changing, modern convenience we have all come to know and love: electric lighting.

From the 1960s to now: a history of distracted driving
From the 1960s to now: a history of distracted driving

Early examples of distracted driving studies go back as far as 1963, when scientist John Senders took to the roads blindfolded – all in the name of research.