“Building” a future . . . Animal Science Center dedicated at Fleming County FFA farm

Posted on Oct 6, 2012
A 50-acre plot of rough land in an industrial park in Flemingsburg is slowly but surely turning into a valuable educational tool for FFA students. And in the process, it has become a source of community pride and regional attention.

The development of a farm for Fleming County FFA has become a community-wide project uniting business, education and agriculture interests. This two-year-old endeavor took a major step forward last month with the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Hinton Mills Animal Science Center. The 60-by-62 barn will be used for livestock projects and storage of hay and equipment.

The next step in the project to develop a regional showplace for FFA is a classroom and conference facility under construction near the Animal Science Center. Peoples Bank is the main funding source for that.

Bud Hinton, President of Hinton Mills, prepares to cut the ribbon on the new animal science center at the Fleming County FFA farm.

Agriculture Commissioner James Comer, himself a former State FFA President, was on hand for the ribbon cutting. Also attending were local business, education and political leaders, as well as a number of officials from surrounding counties, which also have a stake in the project.

Fleming County FB is among the large number of entities that have supported the project in various ways. Hinton Mills, a local, family-owned feed and farm supply company with four stores in the area, was the major contributor for the center. The Louisville-based Farm Credit Service contributed $10,000 for farm development and two of its regional offices kicked in another $2,000.

More photos of Hinton Mills Animal Science Center ribbon cutting

The school board provided a matching grant. Many other groups and businesses have pitched in.

Randall Wood, past president and a Director for Fleming County FB, said the farm’s development epitomizes the term “cooperative effort.”

“The community has really gotten behind this,” said Wood, who works for Hinton Mills.

“It’s been developed into a regional thing that can benefit other counties. This will be a place where we can conduct regional events - -shows, sales, conferences. It’s going to benefit a lot of young people.”

The FFA Chapter plans to maintain a small beef cow-calf herd. The farm also will be used for other livestock projects (the chapter has two sows and 40 lambs) and for crop production, particularly in horticulture. Wood said the project was a dream of retired Vo-Ag teacher Charles Berry, who was at the ceremony.

Commissioner Comer commended the Hinton family (company president Bud Hinton and sons Adam and Nathan, who are company executives) and the community as a whole.

Commissioner Comer was on hand at the ribbon cutting and during his remarks expressed his gratitude toward the Hinton family.

“What a great day!,” he exclaimed, beginning his remarks. “This is an outstanding project that will make a difference for many years to come.”

In his remarks, Adam Hinton was quick to recognize Charles Berry and the spirit of cooperation that has been a trademark of the project’s development.

While explaining the company’s commitment, Adam Hinton said: “At Hinton Mills we believe in the future of agriculture. Who needs to be better prepared for the world than those in agriculture?”

He noted that school officials had reported that 400 of the 750 students at Fleming County High School last year had participated in an agriculture education class.

Wood said the project is part of a rejuvenation of the Vo-Ag program in Fleming County. “Farm Bureau has been strongly behind the ag program; we do whatever we can to support it,” he said.

Tagged Post Topics Include: Adam Hinton, Bud Hinton, Charles Berry, Commissioner of Agriculture, Farm Credit Services, FFA, Fleming County, Fleming County Farm Bureau, Fleming County High School, Flemingsburg, Hinton Mills, James Comer, KFB, Nathan Hinton, Peoples Bank