Jackson County Farm Bureau Celebrates National Ag Week at Tyner Elementary

 

On March 18, 2015 the Jackson County Farm Bureau Women’s Chair, Phyllis Purvis, along with Agency Manager, Brenda Ayers, went to Tyner Elementary School and read the Farm Bureau approved book “The Beeman” to a group of kindergarten students. The book was then presented to the Librarian, Tina Huff, to be used in the school Library. The Students were given a folder which included a muffin recipe taken from the book along with a KFB ruler and pencil. A stack of folders were left with Ms. Huff so she could pass them out to other students who she would read to in the next classes. The students were very animated and we enjoyed a lively conversation about bees and honey. This was a great experience for students and the women’s committee members.

 

Phyllis Purvis reads "The Beeman" to a group of Kindergarten students at Tyner Elementary School. 
Jackson County School Bureau donated the book "The Beeman" to the Tyner Elementary School library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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