Jackson County Farm Bureau Commemorates National Farm Health and Safety Week by Taking Part in Annual Field Day

 

Jackson County Farm Bureau commemorated National Health and Safety Week by taking part in the Annual Environmental Field Day for 4th grade students at Sandgap Park on September 19th.

Shane and Micah Ayers, Jackson County Farm Bureau Agents and Phyllis Purvis, Women’s Committee Chair presented information on ATV Safety and discussed ways the students can ride safer and be more protected on the trails. They had safety equipment such as a helmet, vest and boots on hand for the students to see.

The students enjoyed their day as they went from station to station and heard presentations about forestry, gun safety, soil and water conservation, ATV safety, and many others.

 

Students tried on safety equipment as part of the presentation.
4th graders from Tyner Elementary.  Ms. Summers, Mr. Coffey and Ms. Judd’s class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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