Harlan County Farm Bureau presents Conservation Awards to local youth - Kentucky Farm Bureau

Harlan County Farm Bureau presents Conservation Awards to local youth

 

Thousands of students have participated in the Jim Claypool Art and Conservation Writing contests since their introduction in 1974 and 1944, respectively.  The contests educate students on soil, water, forestry and wildlife conservation. Students take the knowledge they have gained and transform it into creative art work and essays. Students can earn monetary prizes on the county, regional and state levels. They are also recognized each year by conservation districts around the state.

The contest is made possible through the hard work and dedication of sponsors such as the Kentucky Farm Bureau Federation, Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts and 121 conservation districts across the state. 

 

Harlan County Farm Bureau President Don Miniard presented Jim Claypool Conservation Awards to more than 30 local youth. The contest is sponsored by Kentucky Farm Bureau. 

 

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