How to pet-proof your holiday décor

With a few minor adjustments, your home can be filled with holiday cheer and remain a jolly place for pets to play.

How to pet-proof your holiday decor blog
Make sure to hang ornaments out of reach of curious paws. Reserve the upper half of the tree for glass, metal, edible, or fragile ornaments.

The holiday season is upon us. As you gear up for the festivities, keep your family’s Santa Paws in mind when decking the halls. After all, nothing can spoil the holiday spirit quite like an unplanned trip to the vet’s office.

  1. (Don’t) rock around the Christmas tree.
    An illuminated evergreen is often the seasonal centerpiece in many of our old Kentucky homes. There are several precautions to keep in mind when it comes to bringing the outdoors inside this holiday season. Rover.com recommends securely anchoring the tree so it does not tip. One quick way to do this is to invest in a quality, sturdy tree stand. For added security, Rover.com suggests also affixing the tree to the ceiling or a door frame using a clear piece of fishing line.

    Tree stand water may contain fertilizers and can be a breeding ground for dangerous bacteria and mold that could harm your pet’s tummy in just a few sips. PetMD recommends covering your stand with the tree skirt or another DIY option, like aluminum foil, plastic wrap, or a towel.

    Ingested pine needles (both real and artificial) can get caught in your furry friend’s intestinal track, puncturing the lining or causing an obstruction. Make sure to keep an eye on curious kitties and playful pups any time they are around the tree, or better yet, block access to the entire tree with a baby gate.
     
  2. Deck the halls with boughs of…anything but holly.
    Many plants commonly used to spruce up homes around the holidays are unfortunately toxic to our canine and feline companions. Holly isn’t so jolly when it causes gastrointestinal upset and lethargy in your furry friend. Other common winter house plants on the naughty list include mistletoe, poinsettias, lilies, and amaryllis, according to the American Kennel Club.
     
  3. Hang stockings – and ornaments – with care.
    Make sure to hang ornaments out of reach of curious paws. Reserve the upper half of the tree for glass, metal, edible, or fragile ornaments. Steer clear of edible ornaments, such as popcorn strands, candy canes, or gingerbread creations. If you can, avoid using metal hooks to hang trimmings, and do daily tree checks to make sure nothing has fallen off or broken.  
     
  4. Don’t get your tinsel in a tangle!
    If you’re a pet owner, it may come as no surprise that tinsel may be an especially irresistible item… especially to cats. Tinsel is one of the most dangerous tree decorations you can choose, according to PetMD.When chewed, tinsel can become trapped in your pet’s intestines, potentially requiring a costly surgery. It’s best to skip the hassle and decorate with something a little less enticing.
     

With a few minor adjustments, your home can be filled with holiday cheer and remain a jolly place for pets to play.
 

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